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20121202
20121210
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KQED (PBS) 40
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English 40
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)
-missile system to turkey; the massive protest against the government in cairo; paul krugman on the stalemate over taxes and spending; the ongoing cholera epidemic in haiti; and american military leadership. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the borde
headlines around the globe. conflicteteriorating -- concerns that the u.s. -- that the government will use chemical weapons. >> i want to make it clear that the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. >> centuries after ernest shackleton to the death defying journey, a new team is out to repeat the trip, minus any modern conveniences. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness st
, more conflict between them. >> the syrian government is under increasing pressure tonight. the american and russian foreign ministers met with the u.n. envoy on syria and hillary clinton said events on the ground in syria are accelerating. she also joined the u.s. defense secretary in expressing concern that damascus is considering using chemical weapons against the rebels. >> i think there is no question that we remain very concerned, very concerned. as the opposition advances, in particular on damascus, the regime might very well consider the use of chemical weapons. >> secretary panetta went on to say that the white house made it clear there will be consequences should the assad regime make the mistake of using those weapons on its own people. for more on the perspective from damascus, i spoke a short time ago to the bbc's jeremy bolon -- jeremy bowen. >> the issue has been pretty firm on the use of chemical weapons. any news from damascus? >> i think the regime here can feel the pressure. it has been under huge pressure in the last couple of weeks, increasing pressure. of the most p
, of course, had seized a number of military bases, government military bases and looted the weapons, taken the weapons from those to help arm their arsenals. rather than stay and occupy those bases, however, they've withdrawn knowing the syrian air force could attack those sites. so in recent weeks, the momentum seems to have swung the rebels' way, but right now analysts are very cautious in trying to predict what a tipping point could be for the fall of the regime overall. >> rose: and what happens if it falls? >> absolutely. and what steps next would we take. would assad retreat to the hills in an enclave of some sort, taking some of his chemical weapons with him? would there be some kind of political deal, some brokered deal to get him out of the country? right now many of these are some of the options that the u.s. is exploring with allies and russia for instance, today. as we reported in the "new york times," the administration is communicating through russia to syria against not only using these chemical weapons but against these type of attacks. >> rose: how do you measure the relat
to punish russian officials accused of human rights offenses-- a move the russian government has denounced. the house passed the legislation last month. president obama has pledged to sign it into law. it was all smiles today for the duchess of cambridge, as she left a london hospital. the former kate middleton was discharged after being treated for severe morning sickness. the duchess emerged with her husband, prince william, three days after being admitted. the hospital stay prompted royal officials to announce her pregnancy to the public. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first f
the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >> first i have given myself a little out at the beginning by saying this is a purely personal reminiscence
at the terms of a new economic force in the world. they probably need the african governments to safeguard what they have one after years, decades, a couple centuries to european powers and make sure they do not sell them, but as far as economic trading relationships are concerned, material, in exchange for technology, in exchange even for political alliances, i always wondered about that. tavis: made the argument is because free enterprise and colonization sometimes goes hand in hand. in africa and parts of the world under the guise of free enterprise. >> unfortunately, it does not stand the test of argument. if you say it is a free market. then they must leave the african countries to seek the best conditions for their own development. there are similar aspects of chinese policy, backing some very villainess governments, but that does not mean we should repeat. tavis: the u.s. has been guilty of it as well. >> france, england, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took
tense face- off between the two branches of government. >> with 28 days left to come to a deal on the nation's fiscal cliff, the white house is holding firm on its proposal to raise taxes on the wealthy. spokesman jay carney. >> the obstacle remains at this point the refusal to acknowledge by republican leaders that there is no deal that achieves the kind of balance that is necessary without raising rates on the top 2% wealthiest americans. the math simply does not add up. >> ifill: the white house proposes raising $1.6 trillion in taxes over ten years, imposing higher rates on those making more than $250,000 a year. in a letter sent to the white house today, speaker of the house john boehner rejected the president's approach, writing that republicans cannot in good conscience agree to this approach which is neither balanced nor realistic. his counter-offer, save $2.2 trillion by among other things raising $800 billion in new revenues. the plan would also raise the future eligibility age for medicare and alter medicaid to save another $600 billion. the republican plan would not
its rating on u.s. government bonds. now, the president has proposed he be given authority to raise the debt ceiling without congressional action. house republicans reject that idea. and they've called for raising revenue without rate hikes, plus major savings in entitlement programs. the president argued today a partial deal is possible on taxes, if the g.o.p. will agree to raise rates on the top 2%. >> and if we can get the leadership on the republican side to take that framework, to acknowledge that reality, then the numbers actually aren't that far apart. another way of putting this is, we can probably solve this in about a week. >> reporter: despite issuing a warning to congressional republicans, the president also expressed optimism that some gop lawmakers may be warming to the idea of allowing taxes on the wealthy to rise. but here at the capitol today, congressional republican leaders said the president should focus less on tax increases and more on spending cuts >> we put an offer on the table. now he has out of hand rejected that. where are the specifics? where are the dis
, but nonetheless, you have the other branches of government. . there's also the definition of the future of egyptian society. >> i was interested to see what you were writing about on the bbc website. you point out that while the elections may be exciting, the future of egypt is enshrine in this constitution that they are haggling over right now. >> and obviously, the constitution, you could argue whether egypt is better with or without one. probably better with one. although, there are great problems with freedom of religion, freedom of association, freedom of the press, freedom of rights for women. it will have to be improved upon. >> this is where political will and puritanism will be enshrined. >> will these various players compete to monopolize? that has been their experience and tradition going back tomorrow. or will this competition and tension actually produce respect for the roles of these institutions and compromise? something that they are clearly going to have to try to figure out. >> and you can see it even with americans in capitol hill. what are your thoughts about how thi
we are hearing is the language of martyrdom. forces of an elected government struck down by those who opposed it. it is another sign of how polarizing egypt is becoming. at the heart of the crisis is president morsi giving him self immunity. he has called a referendum on the constitution. tonight, thousands of activists gathered outside the presidential palace. in scenes reminiscent of what happened when hosni mubarak was toppled, the soldiers provided a photo opportunity. here they have their heroes and those they call martyrs. from all of them the same accusation, the revolution was hijacked. >> he has broken all of his mandate. he has put himself above ala. he has done everything to break down his legitimacy. >> a country was united about the dictatorship is now divided over how to replace it. bbc news, cairo. >> from egypt to the civil war that shows no signs of stopping. today, hillary clinton reiterated that president aside departure would be crucial. jeremy has been to a prison in damascus were some of the fighters are being held. this is his report. >> the soundtrack of the da
obtained the government investigation video and showed it to hull for the first time. >> i'm just amazed that i'm even here. i remembering hearing a loud noise. >> smith: a huge piece of steel broke lose. >> my head was jammed into the piece of steel and knocked me out. >> smith: hull fell 240 feet, but his life was spared after his safety harness broke the fall. >> the operator pulled the wrong lever. frankie was with me on the trip from nebraska to texas and back. >> neither one of us was rested. and we have the end result that we do today. >> smith: hull suffered severe internal injuries and is now permanently disabled. >> it was a bad day. or a good day, whichever way you want to look at it. i walked away from it. >> smith: so a lot of time pressure. you saw that often in your work? >> all the time. >> smith: all the time? >> we saw it all the time. >> smith: veteran climbers like wally reardon say that time pressure often leads to something called free climbing. >> free climbing's any time when a person's climbing on a tower where you're not connected to a fall arrest system. >> smi
strength? >> you want to favor the systems. unfortunately, the more the government becomes intrusive, the more things have to follow a script. it cannot handle this type of system. we are in a situation today where a lot of countries got there because of trial and error. it does not work that way. there are other problems involved, which is a moral hazard. in the past, people were harmed by their own mistakes. today, we're starting to see a wedge between those who benefit from a mistake and those who are harmed by it. bankers, for example, are not harmed by their mistakes. we have a lack of skin in the game. the world is not as stable as i would like to be. tavis: is that why you argue that bankers should not receive bonuses if they take federal funds? >> bonuses for bankers from allies is the system. someone has an upside -- on the other hand, they transfer the downside -- april 15, we pay for bankers' bonuses in directly. a lot of the problems we have today comes from that structure. the system became very fragile because some people had a vested interest in engaging in risky strat
with the government. until the system changes, the people will never benefit from absolute freedom, basically. they trade with the entire world, but the country is an economic mess, because it is a centralized government. the people are not free to be entrepreneurs, to have opinions, to travel. it is a mess. unfortunately, it is one of those regimes. there has not been an election in over 50 years. this is a project i have been developing a couple of years, with hillary hemingway, his niece. it deals with the last 10 years of his life in cuba, during the time he wrote "the old man and the c." it is a film we have been financing for a couple of years. i have the honor to have support from sir anthony hopkins and annette bening. we are coming not to the finish line, but to the beginning. the finish line is at the end. it is an interesting place now. if you are in independent film, you have to go which it almost span the globe over there. you have to bring money from all over the world to make a movie these days. it takes time. especially when the project is ambitious, in terms of budget. tavis:
the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next year, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> reporter: so although the labor market is not getting worse, it's not getting a lot better, either. and there are plenty of risks that could cause businesses to cancel projects, and hiring plans. >> clearly one of the biggest risks is that we don't see a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it out over a number of months. a
's, and debt reduction commission had recommended that you raise tens of revenue for the federal government, you do tax reform, and you actually lower rates while you expand the base, and the reason is that if you raise rates, you injure economic expansion, if you lower them, you exhilarated, and by making deductions, you make the tax system a more fair wind. you have the lawyers who work around the rates and and they have lobbies -- >> may i say -- >> no principle involved? >> i heard the july 2011 statement argument first ramesh lemmel. -- first from rush limbaugh. i think i heard it from drudge -- >> did you see it on tape? >> i know where it comes from and you repeated quite well. rates first?h bill clinton did who changed it again, george w. bush. they thought it made sense. it tried to change the composition by making it about revenue -- you unwatched people don't understand the difference between rates and revenue. >> bring us all together, please. >> with the number of lobbyists and the super pacs morphing into lobbyists, god knows what will happen with the deductions. that will tak
that at some point between 2012 and 2002, there was some exasperation within the united states government about the failure to find osama bin laden. and if you ask anybody as i did often at this table, they would say we don't know. they would say we've lost the trail. fair enough. so there was some pressure on the people who were charged with doing this because the president had set -- first thing on panetta, get this guy. >> it's an enormous amount of pressure and what we try to demonstrate in the film, the stake weren't just about 9/11 right because al-qaeda continued to attack western targets. and you know, to have the job where if you make a wrong decision, you know, you might somehow be comfortable for not preventing an act tack spain. >> for every day, there could be another london bombing or another marriott. a myriad of events could happen so that's the pressure you're under as well. >> rose: but not to contradict that point we also know events took place and continue to take place after osama bin laden was killed because al-qaeda spawned kind of different organizions, in asia. >> yes.
this say program that is governed by state law and administered by the state. and states pay up to 26 weeks of benefits, six months for people who lost jobs through no fault of their own. but if bad economic times historically congress has authorized additional levels of benefits. this time it is a program called the emergency unemployment compensation system. and there are four different tiers depending on how bad your state unemployment rate is every state gets 14 weeks. nine states get up to 47 a decisional weeks. and the rest are in betweenment but you have to be over 9% to get that additional 47 weeks. >> brown: so it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> right. and it's unique this time around. this particular end of the month is a clear-cuttoff time. we have-- . >> brown: in the past it was phased out. >> right. and as harry said in your piece pointed out this is really the worst time of the year for this to happen. so what we need to do now is not just say oh let's just extend them. i think everyone thinks something like that has to happen. and i
the federal government under pressure. credit ratings agency fitch calls the fiscal cliff the biggest concern for state credit in 2013. saying, "any meaningful federal deficit reduction is likely to lower state funding, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply management's purchasing managers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff saut says investors seem to be ignoring bad news, and this is a bullish sign. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's hap
is just shifted from the federal government to the states, that's not really saving anything. and the president understands that. we think it is really important. recognizing if there are cuts in funds, there ought to be a corresponding reduction in some of the requirements that are put on the states. so we really, as much as anything else, wanted to make sure that our voices are heard and that as decisions are made, whether it is about taxes, whether it is about spending cuts, that they be done equitably and with our input. >> susie: your state is headquarters to many large american companies. and if their taxes go up, which everybody is expecting, what would that mean for jobs in delaware, and also for your state's economy? >> well, across the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules a
or firms not employing people that they ordinarily would have. >> reporter: friday, the government will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual ra
the government from paying the debts accrued by congress itself. so there is something absurd in congress coming in behind, and saying all of am money that we appropriated, we -- this money that we appropriated, we don't want to pay for it. we want to default on the national debt. >> if he has the power to raise the debt ceiling, the defacto power to do that, is that causing a mall-balancing, a bad balancing between the executive branch and the legislative branch? >> not at all. because the congress still has the power of the purse. if they don't want to spend money, then they don't have to spend money. all this does is saying that the congress does not unilaterally default. >> raising the debt ceiling does not trespass in that area. it is not the power of the purse. >> it is not. what they want to do is they want to extend what mcconnell gave for a year, which is that the white house can raise the debt ceiling, and then congress can disapprove it with a two- thirds vote. so if they're that upset about it, they can weigh in. >> let me give you a question here that can relate to you very well, mr
within the counsel of government. how was that received at that time? >> well, in the middle of the 30s he was regarded as a real nuisance because he was talking about hitler but he was also making a fuss about other issues about india, all the an by-- abdication in which he was felt to be way out on opinions. and the feeling is winston is making a fuss because he wants to get back into office. by 38y, 39y, particularly after munich there is a strong sense, actually, although winston is a nuisance he's right on the fundamental thing. and he is the great advantage for churchill is that when war comes, he is in a position of not having been tainted. he's not got dirty hands. he has a really clear record. can speak with authority. and there is an overwhelming desire to see him back in government. >> and he manages an extraordinary passage for the british parliament because there was this growing unease, particularly after munich, so many people deep in their gut knew that a terrible mistake had been made. and that became then a laugh because of the pace. and he manages to take that and tur
kate's condition. the government confirmed it will be moving quickly to pass a law ensuring that if their first child is a girl, she will definitely be third in line to the throne. she will not be passed over by any younger brother. >> the old-fashioned rules where only a boy could become the king and his oldest sister would not be allowed to, the rules will be swept aside and that is change, and updating of the rules that many people would welcome. >> alan farthing was spotted. leading the treatment. >> it is one of the worst things i have ever gone through, bar none. it puts your body through minutes you never thought you have. i felt there were times when i felt like my body had been poisoned. >> for william but most particularly for kate, these are testing days. they know there will have the support of their families, of each other, and of millions of people who they have never met. bbc news at the king edward the seventh hospital. >> the duchess of cambridge spending a second night in hospital for morning sickness. it was famously called the fast as talk of jobs in the
or higher taxes less government or more government, more freedom and less freedom. and republican ideals mitt romney carried the day. stevens was a controversial figure throughout the campaign. he drew criticism externally for being too cautious in defining his candidate and internally for being a sometimes divisive and material figure. in august a new republic profiled him as friendship with mitt romney. the article was published under the title the square and the flare. i've known stuart stevens for a long time and i am pleased to have him here at this table this one of his first conversations about the politics 2012, who won, who lost and why. thank you for coming. >> well i can clarify that. we lost. >> rose: but when did you think you were going to lose? >> we're always very realistic about it contrary to some roorts. we thought we had a good chance to win. after the storm i never had a good feeling. not that the storm impacted things that much per se but these races, a race like this is a lot like an mba game and it's all about ball control at the end. we went from, in every incum
of topics, like the fiscal cliff. >> we're cutting on the order in $100 billion in government expenditures. >> reporter: khan started out teaching his cousin math over a we cam. when he posted his videos on youtube, they caught on like wildfire. khan quit his job at a hedge fund and began creating lessons in earnest from his closet. today, the khan academy boasts a full staff. universities like m.i.t. and stanford and for-profit companies like corsara and udacity have jumped into the mix with their own online classes. >> what's exciting about online learning is it's not your -- there's not a competition between the intellectual and your everyday life. they can happen at the same time. >> reporter: khan's vision, anyone can watch his videos anywhere for free at their own pace. his program, and ideas, are now being used by school districts from east palo alto to los angeles. you specialize in online lessons, so people might find it surprising that you're partnering with brick and mortar schools. why did you decide to do that? >> i have young children, and my personal -- i want them to go to
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)